Episode 22.1 of the VeloReviews Podcast is out

Well whadda ya know – I finally made a podcast!

As mentioned previously, I’ve taken on a new role over at VeloReviews.com, and part of that is the podcast.  As my first podcast produced for VeloReviews, we’ve got Fitness Editor Al Painter doing some interviews with racers at the Sea Otter Classic.

Fire up iTunes and give it a listen.  Or, have a listen to it right here.

And keep an eye on VeloReviews.com – we’ve already got the recording of Episode 23 scheduled for next week, and we’re going to try out a couple of things to try and get the community involved during the recording.

Best bone I could think of to break

I like to think of myself as an “individual” – different from the rest of the pack.  I do things my own way, and don’t follow the masses.  That’s why I was sure the first bone I broke in a cycling accident would be something interesting.  Maybe it would be my foot that got broke – as all the folks that were on my wheel accidentally ran over it.  That would be cool.  Or perhaps I’d blow up my patella.  Sounds super-painful, but has something of the “never heard of that” going for it.

Or better yet, maybe I’d be that guy that had a front wheel buckle in the final turn of a crit, flying into a light pole at about 32 MPH, only to stand right up and start cursing the wheel manufacture in Italian.  Oh yea – that’s be my signature crash.

Well, fate has a way of blowing your best ideas.

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JustAnotherCyclist and VeloReviews join forces

As announced on episode 22 of the VeloReviews Podcast, I’ve inherited the the incredible cycling community originally created by Jeff Helfand.  The announcement was made to the community on Sunday, April 3.

For readers of JustAnotherCyclist that are not currently familiar with VeloReviews – go check it out.  Become a member of the greatest no-drop ride on the internet!

Over the coming weeks the resources of JustAnotherCyclist will be merged into VeloReviews.  Exactly how that will happen still remains to be determined, but followers of JAC will find that there are a whole lot more resources available to them after this transation.

Stay tuned!

Rate your favorite bike photos

The popularity of the movie The Social Networksomewhat loosely inspired by the actual history of Facebook – exposed a lot of folks to the idea of presenting two random photos side by side, picking which of the two you like better.  It is an interesting idea.  After watching the movie, I actually thought “Wouldn’t it be cool to do that with bicycle photos.”

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Is your day job killing your cycling?

Cycling, simply put, is not exactly the cheapest of hobbies.  And until we can make that big leap into the pro ranks (which is almost, but not entirely, impossible for a 37 year old) we generally have to do something when we aren’t riding to make a few bucks.  But sometimes that balance just doesn’t work out so well.

I’ve been in that situation for the last few months.  I’m a tech guy – systems engineer, responsible for keeping my company’s servers up and running.  And I’ve been working for a startup.  That means a lot of hours.  One can not ride with their keyboard in front of them.

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War on cars?

It is not uncommon for us cyclists to think that we, among all of the road users, have a more objective opinion.  This is not necessarily hubris or arrogance, but due to the fact that most cyclists are also occasionally motorists.  Not only do we ride bicycles, but we often drive too.  So, goes the logical argument, we can see both sides.  It is difficult for me to know for sure if this opinion is accurate or objective – as it is my particular perspective as well.

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Cycle to work, UK style

I’ve recently been thinking a lot about cycling to work from the employer’s point of view.  Are there gains or losses to revenue to be had by employers adopting a particular policy on cycling to work?  Are companies actively encouraging employees to cycle to work?  Are they doing this through awareness campaigns, or by providing facilities like showers and bike lockers.  Perhaps they are actively encouraging employees – sponsoring bike to work days or other such programs.

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Softride Solo 700 – an introduction to beam bikes

If you’ve never seen a Softride, or bikes that look like it, you might be wondering what’s going on here.  No, this isn’t a folding bike.  Rather, it belongs to a class of bikes known as beam bikes.

Beam bikes place the seat on a beam that attaches to the frame near the head tube and suspends the rider over the rear wheel without a seat tube or other support.

There actually are a few different manufactures of this frame design, many of them competitive.  They had a growing following in the 1990’s among the time trial and triathlon crowd, up until the UCI got involved.  In 1999, the UCI banned beam bikes – or more specifically, any bike without a seat tube – from competitive events, declaring them an unfair advantage.

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Sacramento Area Bike Trail Closed Mar 13

The American River Bike Trail in Sacramento will be closed on the morning of March 13th for the 7th running of the Shamrock’n Half Marathon.

According to the published map, the event does a loop through Sacramento, and enters the bike trail at Northgate Blvd.  It follows the trail all the way into Discovery Park.

 

The Cycle Chic Manifesto

Look out fellow lycrarians™.  The Cycle Chic crowd has a manifesto – so you know they’re up to something.

First they start toddling around town on vintage bicycles.

Then they bring back leather handle bar wrappings – for shame!

But a manifesto!  Nothing says “crazy radical agenda” like a manifesto.

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