Time to take my cyclo-prozac

Woke up in a totally crappy mood this morning. No idea why. I found myself pacing around the house in circles while trying to simply put my clothes on. Some days are just like that. I looked outside. Beautiful sunny day. But I didn’t really care. All I thought was “gee… at least I won’t get rained on during my ride to work…”

Ride to work…Now there is something positive.

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Brooks Saddles. They’re that good.

Ran across this in down town San Francisco today. And you thought your puny little bike chain wrapped around your saddle rail and frame was enough.

Protect that Brooks!

A photo posted by JustAnotherCyclist (@janothercyclist) on

Portland’s bridge to the future


Portland, Oregon continues to demonstrate their dedication to multi-modal transportation options with the September 12, 2015 opening of the Tilikum Crossing over the Willamette River. No worries about how cars and bicycles will interact on this bridge – cars aren’t allowed. This bridge is all about transit, shoes and pedals.

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Just be nice…

Photo by Richard Masoner / Cyclelicious  https://www.flickr.com/photos/bike/
Photo by Richard Masoner / Cyclelicious https://www.flickr.com/photos/bike/

There is a scene in the movie Roadhouse where the main character is telling the bar staff at a rather rough bar to just “be nice.” If you haven’t seen it – it is a classic. Go watch it. If you have, stop rolling your eyes at me…

Anyhow, it struck me today how great the advice from this scene is for all of us bicycle commuters out there. There is far to much confrontational thinking where none is needed. Sometimes it is motorists thinking we are complete asses, and sometimes it is us assuming motorists are complete asses just out to kill us. But I had three separate incidents in the past two days that have turned me back on to the idea of “just being nice.” Keep reading →

A day in the life…

This video just popped up, making its rounds on some of the local San Francisco social media scenes. Passed along for your enjoyment.

Do you name your bikes?

I’ve always like to name my bikes. In fact, I like to name and personify lots of things. I used to do it with my cars too. Thought I’d take a moment to share some of my current stable of regularly ridden bikes:

  • bridgeMaul. My main road bike, a Cannondale CAAD10 with SRAM Force. It is black, white and red and when I initially got it switching to aluminum felt like turning to the dark side. I’ll let you draw your own conclusions on where the name came from.
  • Sherman. This is my cargo bike. If it were a car it would probably be a 1973 Ford F250 with a 1978 Ford bed somehow bolted on. This bike is all work. A Pugeot Pipeline 5 with an Xtracycle FreeRadical conversion done to it. Again, I’ll leave it to you to be creative about the origin of the name.
  • Waldo. This is my mountain bike – a modified Breezer Lightning. This name is a little more obscure. For some reason the name ‘Waldo’ has always reminded me of a hippy type, camping in a tent wearing cut off jeans. And if any MTBers out there take offense to that image… well.

And following suit, my son has taken on this naming tradition as well. His custom painted and built Fuji Ace 26 frame – thanks to Dean Alleger of Orange Cat Racing – has been given the moniker ‘Steve.’ I’m afraid I can’t say where that name comes from though….

Is cycling a sign of gentrification?

Living in the city of San Francisco in 2015, you are constantly confronted with issues of class struggle and gentrification.  In most parts of the city the rent you’d pay for 1 month in a 1 bedroom apartment could buy you a functional used car elsewhere in the country (or one hell of a nice bike). I also happen to live in a neighborhood that was, until recently, one of the most affordable (relatively) in the city. As a predominately African American community, this puts the area directly in the crosshairs of everything potentially bad about gentrification and displacement. Lots of new people moving in, demanding change. Lots of established families that have been in the neighborhood for generations feeling pushed out both socially and economically.

It is against this backdrop that I came face to face with an issue that at first seemed completely unfathomable for me: for many, cycling is a sign of gentrification. Keep reading →

Don’t be an asshole cyclist

MFB-FrameWe can all be jerks sometimes. During my 10 mile commute to and from the office every day I get a lot of time to observe assholery on the streets of San Francisco. No… this is NOT going to be a rant about drivers behaving badly. In fact, I feel pretty good about riding a bike on these city streets. No… this is about assholery by fellow cyclists. Keep reading →

Helmet hair to hair helmet

For as many times as I’ve rambled, made fun of, attacked, or complained about helmets, you’d think I’d have come across this before. Ironically, it was a coworker that pointed this cultural phenomenon to me.

When inflatable neck wear doesn’t do it for you, it is time to don the hair-helmet. Brought to you by that fantastic folk duo Flight of the Conchords and presented without comment:


So we take the worry about helmet hair and replace it with a hair helmet. That’s what you call turning a frown upside down.

I think Scion is afraid of hipsters

I ran across this commercial the other day while watching some drivel on TV:

I was immediately struck by the very prominently displayed bicycle line drawing art (which I now want by the way.) I did find myself wondering “Why in the heck would the advertisers do that?” As an urban cyclist, I more often view the bicycle as something to be used instead of a car. It reminded me of a MotorTrend article I had read recently examining the decline in car ownership in the younger generations: Keep reading →