A day in the life…

This video just popped up, making its rounds on some of the local San Francisco social media scenes. Passed along for your enjoyment.

Just another bike commuter

Your feel-good link of the day. The Eau Claire, Wisconsin newspaper Leader-Telegram give us a story about Tom Arneberg. Tom had been doing his short commute to work by bicycle for 22 years. But when his job was relocated to 16 miles away, things could have been disastrous. Keep reading →

Chalk this up as a WTF?

I try to be open minded. Really I do. But I saw this and all I could say is… WTF?

Kilimanjaro-3-4-clipped

Keep reading →

Tapering for the big event

No... Not 'tapir' - taper.
No… Not ‘tapir’ – taper.

It is a frequent mistake of many cyclists – overtraining. No where is this more true then the weeks leading up to a big event. I’m right there, right now. In two weeks from today I will have just finished the Seattle to Portland ride. That means this is prime time for me to think about tapering, and how that impacts my training schedule.

This year my training schedule had a bit of tapering forced upon it by a mechanical failure on a training ride. With my primary road bike in the shop a lot of my recent training rides were skipped, or switched completely different style of bike. But for most, the tapering process should be a lot more deliberate and planned. And no…. riding less is not going to undo all the hard work you have put in in the saddle. Keep reading →

Your source for cycling news: NPR??

national-public-radio-npr-logo_100318079_mI’ve been out of the habit somewhat lately, but I’ve maintained a list of online sources that I routinely scan through for story ideas for here (JustAnotherCyclist) and VeloReviews. In addition to my list of the usual suspects, I also rely on a few Google Alerts to help throw in some variety.

Every once in awhile I find cycling related post in my Google Alerts emails from National Public Radio (NPR) sources. Usually these are stories about the environmental impacts of cycling, or the apparent dangers of cycling, or stories regarding key cycling related transportation legislation. I was a bit surprised, however, to find an article about a particular pro cyclist. An article that would have fit in just about any cycling magazine, blog or website you can imagine. Keep reading →

Our most popular posts

It used to be that every once in awhile television shows would put out a “remember when” type episode. If it was a sitcom, the characters would find themselves sitting around in a livingr oom or coffee house or something, reminiscing which would lead to flash back sequences of footage from past episodes. I always figured these were the episodes thrown together when most of the writing staff was on vacation or something.

I guess you could say that this post is kind of like that – only I am the writing staff and I’m not actually on vacation. Keep reading →

Do you name your bikes?

I’ve always like to name my bikes. In fact, I like to name and personify lots of things. I used to do it with my cars too. Thought I’d take a moment to share some of my current stable of regularly ridden bikes:

  • bridgeMaul. My main road bike, a Cannondale CAAD10 with SRAM Force. It is black, white and red and when I initially got it switching to aluminum felt like turning to the dark side. I’ll let you draw your own conclusions on where the name came from.
  • Sherman. This is my cargo bike. If it were a car it would probably be a 1973 Ford F250 with a 1978 Ford bed somehow bolted on. This bike is all work. A Pugeot Pipeline 5 with an Xtracycle FreeRadical conversion done to it. Again, I’ll leave it to you to be creative about the origin of the name.
  • Waldo. This is my mountain bike – a modified Breezer Lightning. This name is a little more obscure. For some reason the name ‘Waldo’ has always reminded me of a hippy type, camping in a tent wearing cut off jeans. And if any MTBers out there take offense to that image… well.

And following suit, my son has taken on this naming tradition as well. His custom painted and built Fuji Ace 26 frame – thanks to Dean Alleger of Orange Cat Racing – has been given the moniker ‘Steve.’ I’m afraid I can’t say where that name comes from though….

This mountain bike is going to make me faster.

This mountain bike is going to make me faster.

It was one of those “Well duh!” sort of moments. The times when you suddenly realize something that, in retrospect, should have been obvious all along. And once I did I knew that riding my mountain bike on the streets was going to make me ride better on every bike. Keep reading →

Is cycling a sign of gentrification?

Living in the city of San Francisco in 2015, you are constantly confronted with issues of class struggle and gentrification.  In most parts of the city the rent you’d pay for 1 month in a 1 bedroom apartment could buy you a functional used car elsewhere in the country (or one hell of a nice bike). I also happen to live in a neighborhood that was, until recently, one of the most affordable (relatively) in the city. As a predominately African American community, this puts the area directly in the crosshairs of everything potentially bad about gentrification and displacement. Lots of new people moving in, demanding change. Lots of established families that have been in the neighborhood for generations feeling pushed out both socially and economically.

It is against this backdrop that I came face to face with an issue that at first seemed completely unfathomable for me: for many, cycling is a sign of gentrification. Keep reading →

Bike Shop Girl: A blog for the ladies

Bike Shop GirlI recently discovered the blog Bike Shop Girl and I’ve been quite impressed. As a fellow blogger, I first noticed its beautiful layout and design, ease of use and the presence of quality, original content. I was also excited to find a site that was focusing on the much-underserved community of women cyclists.

Bike Shop Girl is me, Arleigh Jenkins. With over 12+ years of bicycle industry experience from running bike shops, seasoned bike mechanic & fitter, to avid bike commuter and racer; you can say I’ve done almost everything. I started Bike Shop to reach more women and make their cycling experience better.

Keep reading →